Sending sunshine your way. other’s dreams by just being there in formation.

People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are traveling on the thrust of one another.

Let’s hope we can all learn to support each each, uplifting each Science is beginning to catch up to what the sages and mystics knew for centuries. As each bird flaps its wings, it creates an "uplift" for the bird following. Lessons From Geese - By Milton Olson. Maybe you will be interested in knowing why they do it this way... By flying in a "V" formation, the whole flock increases the flight efficiency by 71% compared to just one bird flying alone. Family Business and Wealth Administration, Mediator Richard Graham to Discuss His Role in Pulitzer Prize Winner's New Book, April Y. Walker Becomes Full-Time Mediator With Upchurch Watson White & Max, UNCITRAL Convention on Enforcement of International Settlement Agreements and Amended Model Law on International Conciliation Take Another Step Forward, Register for OCBA Arbitration Seminar with Lawrence Kolin by March 28, Lawyer Professionalism as a Tool for Successful Negotiation, Don't Bring a Knife to a Gunfight: Florida Case Law Update on Daubert and Other Expert Witness Pitfalls, Upchurch Watson White & Max Elevates Mediator Charles A. Encouragement.

Lessons from Geese provides a perfect example of the importance of team work and how it can have a profound and powerful effect on any form of personal or business endeavour. I absolutely love the wisdom that nature shares with us if we are just willing to slow down, look and listen. When a goose gets sick or wounded or shot down, two geese drop out of formation and follow it down to help and protect it. "Chuck" Mancuso to Shareholder, MIDDLE PASSAGE: FROM MISERY TO MEANING IN MIDLIFE, UWWM Repeats Its Tier 1 "Best Law Firms" Ratings for Mediation/Arbitration. The geese in formation honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed. I just absolutely love how nature teaches us such great lessons if we are willing to slow down, look and listen. This lesson set is based on an article written in 1972 by Dr. Robert McNeish and entitled Lessons From the Geese. Lesson: People who share a common direction and sense a community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are traveling on the thrust of one another. Lesson: If we have as much sense as the geese, we’ll stand by each other like that. The geese in formation honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed. It means a lot.

When a goose gets sick or wounded or shot down, two geese drop out of formation and follow their fellow member down to help provide protection. We have mediated cases across the nation, and will travel anywhere for you and your clients. Then they launch out on their own, with another formation, or catch up with the flock. Lessons from the Geese Working Together Another reason that supports the geese suggesting that one is not alone is that they fly together. Teamwork Lessons from the Geese This fall, when you see Geese heading south for the winter, flying along in ‘V’ formation, you might consider what science has discovered as to why they fly that way. When the lead goose gets tired, it rotates back into the formation and another goose flies at the point position. To lead any endeavor, especially a scattered church, requires huge amounts of effort. Thank you for being there for me Lynn. I created this video: Lessons from the Geese a couple of years ago. When we use these five principles in our personal and business life it will help us to foster and encourage a level of passion and energy in ourselves, as well as those who are our friends, associates or team members.

I hope that you enjoy the video and it inspires you to look at nature through a different lens.

Here is the poem in its entirety: When you see geese flying along in V formation, you might consider what science has discovered as to why they fly that way. The poem states, “By flying in V formation, the whole flock adds at least 71% greater flying range than if each bird flew on its own.” Not I am grateful to Dr. McNeish for giving me permission to use this story in my book whenever it will be ready! Your email address will not be published. It’s so true about learning from the geese. Your email address will not be published. Lesson: People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are traveling on the thrust of one another. It is definitely all about collaboration and nature teaches us that with such ease and grace. Separation from nature is causing many of the chronic illnesses that we are dealing with today. Download 5 Great Benefits of Getting Outdoors. Lessons From Geese. .

Lesson: It pays to take turns doing the hard tasks and sharing leadership – with people, as with geese, interdependent with one other. By flying in a “V” formation, the whole flock adds 71% more flying range than if each bird flew alone. By flying in a “V” formation, the whole flock adds 71% greater flying range than if each bird flew alone.

As each goose flaps its wings it creates an “uplift” for the birds that follows. They stay with this member of the flock until he or she is either able to fly again or dies. As each bird flaps its wings, it creates uplift for the bird immediately following. Interdependence 1. It shows how nature teaches us some very valuable lessons. So warn'd, the geese-flock legions to gentler regions pass, — To the balmy Southern clime, where the orange and the lime, With blossom'd fruits, perennial shoots, are ever in their prime; To paradise ambrosial, to banks of spic'd perfume, Where forests wide and river-side are prodigal with bloom. It is now used worldwide, both in churches and in the business community, as a helpful illustration of good leadership. So appreciate your support and you taking the time to make a comment. Nature sure has a way of showing us the way to be in community with each other. By Catherine Klasne. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. I had planned on launching my book about nature’s lessons in the spring of 2014, but the universe had other plans for me. Thanks for your beautiful insight Wes. Lesson: We need to make sure our honking from behind is encouraging – not something less helpful.

The ego would have us believe it’s dependance, but nature would want us to know it’s really symbiosis. The geese in formation honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed.

5. To a Flock of Geese As each goose flaps its wings, it creates an “uplift” for the bird following. Lesson #4. They stay with it until it is able to fly again or dies. Lesson: If we have as much sense as a goose, we will join in formations with those who are headed where we want to go. Whenever a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the drag and resistance of trying to fly alone, and quickly gets back into formation to take advantage of the “lifting power” of the bird immediately in front. As each goose flaps its wings, it creates an “uplift” for the bird following. By flying in a “V” formation, the whole flock adds 71% more flying range than if each bird flew alone. Then they launch out on their own, with another formation, or catch up with their own flock. To break the trail for others, to be the lead bird, is to be a target, and that can be stressful and wearying. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 4. Here is to you hearing these messages. Required fields are marked *. Dr. McNeish, who spent many years teaching science, first wrote this object lesson as part of a sermon he presented in his church. As background information, this wonderful story  was done  by scientist and teacher, Dr. Robert McNeish. The next season, when you see the geese migrating, going to a warmer place.... Pay attention that they fly in a "V" formation. Nature heals, naturally. When the lead goose gets tired, it rotates back into the formation and another goose flies at the point position. Love your blog, Susanne! By flying in a “V” formation, the whole flock adds 71% greater flying range than if the bird flew alone. 3. Lesson: People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are traveling on the thrust of one another. When you see geese flying along in V formation, you might consider what science has discovered as to why they fly that way. Thanks so much Heather. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Our firm invites you to browse our useful library of agreements, articles, links, and other downloads.